Horarium
  • Monday - Friday

    7:00am Mass & Morning Prayer
    12:00pm Rosary & Midday Prayer
    5:30pm Office of Readings & Evening Prayer
    9:00pm Compline (Monday - Thursday)
  • Saturday

    8:00am Mass with Morning Prayer
    12:00pm Office of Readings & Midday Prayer
    5:20pm Rosary
    5:40pm Evening Prayer
  • Sunday

    8:30am Office of Readings & Morning Prayer
    11:15am Mass
    5:20pm Rosary
    5:40pm Evening Prayer
    9:00pm Compline
Calendar
  • Wednesday, November 26

    Thanksgiving Recess begins at Noon

    No Classes; Offices and Library Closed

  • Thursday-Friday, November 27-28

    Thanksgiving Recess

    No Classes; Offices and Library Closed

  • Monday-Friday, December 1-5

    Course Evaluation Week

  • Friday, December 5

    Classes End

  • Saturday, December 6

    Aesthetics and Culture: Maritain, Modernity, and Beauty

    Thomas S. Hibbs, Baylor University

    7:30 PM - Catholic Center at NYU

  • Monday, December 8

    Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception

    Offices and Library Closed

  • Tuesday-Friday, December 9-12

    Final Examination Period

  • Friday, December 12

    Semester Ends

  • Friday, December 19

    Library and Offices Close at Noon for Christmas Break

  • Monday, January 12, 2015

    Classes Begin

  • Saturday, January 17

    Anglo-Catholic Modernism: Writing Religious Beauty in the Modern Era

    Julia Yost, Yale University

    7:30 PM - Catholic Center at NYU

  • Monday, January 19

    Martin Luther King Jr. Day

    No Classes; Offices and Library Closed

  • Thursday, January 22

    March for Life

    No Classes; Offices and Library Open

  • Friday, January 23

    Last Day to Add or Drop Courses

  • Friday, February 27

    Last Day to Submit Work for Incompletes from the Previous Semester

  • Friday, March 6

    Grades Due on Incompletes from the Previous Semester

  • Monday-Friday, March 9-13

    Spring Break

    No Classes; Offices and Library Open

  • Wednesday, March 18

    Ash Wednesday

    Administrative Thursday - Thursday classes held, no Wednesday classes

  • Thursday, March 19

    Feast of St. Joseph

    No Classes; Offices and Library Open

  • Wednesday, March 25

    Last Day to Withdraw from Classes with a “WD” Grade

  • Thursday-Friday, March 26-27

    Registration for Fall 2015 Classes

  • Monday-Wednesday, March 30-April 1

    Registration for Fall 2015 Classes

  • Thursday, April 2

    Holy Thursday

    No Classes; Offices and Library Closed

  • Friday, April 3

    Good Friday

    No Classes; Offices and Library Closed

  • Monday, April 6

    Easter Monday

    No Classes; Offices and Library Closed

  • Tuesday, April 7

    Administrative Monday - Monday classes held, no Tuesday classes

  • Saturday, April 18

    Fifth Annual Dominican Spring Gala

History of the Pontifical Faculty

Lively interest in theological learning and the intellectual life was bequeathed to the Order of Friars Preachers by its founder, Saint Dominic. Responding to an acute need for well-prepared preachers, Saint Dominic conceived a plan of a mobile band of friars preachers and won the formal approval of Pope Honorius III on December 22, 1216.


In the first decades of the Order’s life, St. Dominic sent friars to establish houses of study at the universities of Paris and Bologna where they could receive the strong doctrinal training necessary to support their preaching activity. These friars attracted many university professors and students to the Order, among them the brilliant young Thomas Aquinas (who entered the Order in 1244). Aquinas’s achievement crystallized the intellectual thrust of the Dominican apostolate from that time onward.

The Dominican House of Studies is heir to this long-standing tradition of theological excellence and preaching, and is linked to other Dominican centers of study throughout the world. A center for theological studies was established in 1834 in Somerset, Ohio, as the first studium generale of the Dominican Order in the United States. At the end of the nineteenth century, discussions began about moving the studium from Ohio to a location on the East Coast, and the provincial chapter of 1892 ordained that the studium be located in New Haven, Connecticut, near Yale University. In 1902, the new provincial, Fr. Lawrence Kearney, determined that Washington, D.C. would be the site for the institution, now called the Dominican House of Studies, and that, preferably, it would be built near the newly-established Catholic University of America, thus conforming to the historic Dominican practice of establishing studia in major university settings. The groundbreaking for the new building on Bunker Hill Road (now Michigan Avenue) took place on April 23, 1903, with James Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore, Archbishop Ryan of Philadelphia, Father Kearney officiating.

In 1941 the Sacred Congregation of Seminaries and Universities of the Apostolic See designated the Dominican House of Studies an Ecclesiastical Faculty of Theology with authorization to confer ecclesiastical degrees; this was only the second such faculty in the United States (after The Catholic University of America). Presently operating under the provisions of the Apostolic Constitution Sapientia Christiana (1979), the House of Studies is authorized to grant the degrees Bachelor of Sacred Theology (S.T.B.), Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.) and Doctor of Sacred Theology (S.T.D.).

The Dominican House of Studies became a member of the Washington Theological Consortium in 1967, and its students and faculty have been actively involved in this ecumenical work since the Consortium’s inception.


In 1970, the House of Studies joined the theological faculties of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (O.M.I.) and the Oblates of Saint Francis de Sales (O.S.F.S.) as part of the Cluster of Independent Theological Schools. At about the same time, and in virtue of its membership in the Cluster, the House of Studies received civil accreditation from the Association of Theological Schools in order to grant the civil degree of Master of Divinity (M.Div.); this accreditation was expanded in 1993 to include granting the civil degree of Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.). With the closing of Oblate College and De Sales Hall in 1996, the Dominican House of Studies expanded its staff and resumed its position as an independent faculty of theology, providing academic and professional training in theology and related disciplines to both Dominicans and non-Dominicans, Catholics and non-Catholics, clergy, seminarians, and laity. The House of Studies marked its centennial year in Washington, D.C. in 2005-2006.